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The details of the Driver & Car™ Analogy are based on twenty-two years of research and dozens of trade secrets. This model is a true example of "disruptive innovation". We are convinced our model leads to more effective results than every other model because we can explain what makes it profoundly unrivaled. Believe it or not, the best way to understand this is by looking at the history of scurvy!

A to B From C

The model from the Scurvy story can be used to show how our culturally accepted strategy of A to B actually results in people being hurt and hurting each other.

160™ - Focused on the Effect

A is the cause and B is the effect.

An example of this is when a bossy person barks orders at someone (A) and it results in the desired behavioral change (B). This bossy person can believe that he ought to speak to everyone in the same manner (A) and rationalize it (yellow B) by pointing to the one and only case where this worked. However, continuing to act in this manner (A) is deception and is going to end up in destruction (yellow B) because the human brain sees this controlling behavior as abuse.

This is a 160™ approach that denies uniqueness and treats people like animals. It is associated with a thought process that believes happiness is achieved through freedom, independent living, avoiding confrontation, and using comparative thinking to rationalize why the abuser doesn't have to fix any of the damage they caused.

80™ - Focused on the Tangible Cause

This would be the same as taking the cause that wasn't working (A) and trying different things until a better effect is seen (red B). In our example, the bossy person could give a speech before they began barking orders, "Please don't take how I act personally. I am not trying to be mean."

This is an 80™ approach that can appear to be correct given the right context, yet the resulting effect is always going to fall short of the true solution. For example, cigarettes were originally advertised as "healthy". Why? Nicotine makes you more alert, which we all agree is "good", especially if you are operating heavy machinery at the end of a long shift. However, the long-term effects of smoking are not "good".

This approach can be made to look good in the short term, but the long-term effects are always unhealthy. It is associated with a thought process that believes happiness can be achieved through limitations/laws, dependence/accountability, hard work, effort, discipline and confrontation that works to restore the damage back to its original condition (sustainability).

This focus on continuous improvement in order to make things better eventually wears the person out and returns them to the 160™ approach.

10™ - Focused on the Intangible Cause

A principle is a foundational truth that applies in every context. If this principle were first identified (C), the A to B would always result in the right answer (blue B).

In the case of dealing with people, first understanding their intangible uniqueness would result in always talking to them in a manner that would motivate them and give them more energy. However, our culture encourages us to focus on the tangible and go "A to B".

Although it is one of the hardest behaviors to change, if a person would first take a step back into their intangible "C", their natural inclination to go from "A to B" would always result in truth and never have to be adjusted.

This is a 10™ approach that always begins in the opposite direction of the 80™ thought process. It is associated with a thought process that believes happiness is achieved through principles with non-contradictory definitions, humility, interdependence, contrastive thinking, and discontinuous improvement (generativity). It is the only way to achieve Flow: the only healthy thought process.

10™
80™
160™

160™ - Focused on the Effect

A is the cause and B is the effect.

An example of this is when a bossy person barks orders at someone (A) and it results in the desired behavioral change (B). This bossy person can believe that he ought to speak to everyone in the same manner (A) and rationalize it (yellow B) by pointing to the one and only case where this worked. However, continuing to act in this manner (A) is deception and is going to end up in destruction (yellow B) because the human brain sees this controlling behavior as abuse.

This is a 160™ approach that denies uniqueness and treats people like animals. It is associated with a thought process that believes happiness is achieved through freedom, independent living, avoiding confrontation, and using comparative thinking to rationalize why the abuser doesn't have to fix any of the damage they caused.

80™ - Focused on the Tangible Cause

This would be the same as taking the cause that wasn't working (A) and trying different things until a better effect is seen (red B). In our example, the bossy person could give a speech before they began barking orders, "Please don't take how I act personally. I am not trying to be mean."

This is an 80™ approach that can appear to be correct given the right context, yet the resulting effect is always going to fall short of the true solution. For example, cigarettes were originally advertised as "healthy". Why? Nicotine makes you more alert, which we all agree is "good", especially if you are operating heavy machinery at the end of a long shift. However, the long-term effects of smoking are not "good".

This approach can be made to look good in the short term, but the long-term effects are always unhealthy. It is associated with a thought process that believes happiness can be achieved through limitations/laws, dependence/accountability, hard work, effort, discipline and confrontation that works to restore the damage back to its original condition (sustainability).

This focus on continuous improvement in order to make things better eventually wears the person out and returns them to the 160™ approach.

10™ - Focused on the intangible Cause

A principle is a foundational truth that applies in every context. If this principle were first identified (C), the A to B would always result in the right answer (blue B).

In the case of dealing with people, first understanding their intangible uniqueness would result in always talking to them in a manner that would motivate them and give them more energy. However, our culture encourages us to focus on the tangible and go "A to B".

Although it is one of the hardest behaviors to change, if a person would first take a step back into their intangible "C", their natural inclination to go from "A to B" would always result in truth and never have to be adjusted.

This is a 10™ approach that always begins in the opposite direction of the 80™ thought process. It is associated with a thought process that believes happiness is achieved through principles with non-contradictory definitions, humility, interdependence, contrastive thinking, and discontinuous improvement (generativity). It is the only way to achieve Flow: the only healthy thought process.

Conclusion

The easiest way to determine your thought process is to give your definition for love. If you can't state a definition out loud, you are living according to a 160™ thought process. If your definition is contradictory, you are living according to an 80™ thought process. Flowcess® has the non-contradictory principle definitions for key words that your unconscious brain already knows. Flowcess® can help you determine your unique intangible "C" in order to always Flow and live a life of increasing joy and healthy happiness.

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